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Street Poets Trash Trash – Unlitter Us

Street Poets Trash Trash – Unlitter Us

The City of Philadelphia Recycling Office’s largest-ever anti-litter campaign consists solely of the spoken word compositions and performances of five Philly street poets, each accompanied by either congas, acoustic bass, or saxophone. The campaign is the work of advertising agency LevLane, Phila., and is part of a city-wide neighborhood improvement initiative by Mayor Michael A. Nutter.
The poetry performances were chosen for power, not prettiness.

The campaign’s ad media executions include 5 each of TV :30s, radio :60s, and transit posters. The campaign will also include street poetry events, Facebook and Twitter presences, signage-designated “Litter Free School Zones,” and (under the auspices of Commmunity Marketing Concepts, Phila.) block-by-block community mobilization drives.
See the :60s ad here.

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The enlistment of authentic Philadelphia street poets derives from the idea that litter is corrosive to a community’s emotional well-being, and that any effective voice for its elimination must be emotional and above all, peer-to-peer. From the 75 spoken word performers (identified mostly through neighborhood high school and college poetry programs, and on late-night public radio) who composed and auditioned their own anti-litter messages, 5 were selected. Their 27-second poems (longer for online) make up the total campaign. Its only other words are the unspoken, agency-written, closing tag, “Un Litter Us.”

 

 

 

 

Radio ad:

 

Print ads:

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Advertiser:
City of Philadelphia Recycling Office
Agency:
LevLane
Additional credits:
CCO: Bruce Lev
Creative Director: Deb Racano
Exec. Art Director: Lori Miller
Copy Writer: Jerry Selber
Poet/Performers: Denice Frohman, Gregory Corbin, Steve Annan, Whitney Peyton, Carlo Campbell
Dir./Prod. Company.: Jim McGorman/Accordion Films, Phila.

Founder of Osocio. It all started with collecting election posters in 1973. And that's never stopped. Read more.
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