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[3+1] Arjan in’t Veld

[3+1] Arjan in’t Veld

We’re very happy with this new episode of [3+1], the new section on Osocio. In this episode the choices from Arjan in’t Veld. His specialty is 50+ marketing, a subject we like to write more about. 50+ isn’t sexy in a world where everything is about being young and acting fast. We started a category Elder Issues a few months ago. Mostly it is about diseases and discomforts but there must be more to tell about. That was the reason why we asked Arjan.
[3+1] is sharing 3 favourite campaigns, designs or other visual things. And 1 failure, something annoying. In short: 3 x good, 1 x bad. Arjan was so enthusiastic, he made [4+1].

Arjan in t veld
I am Arjan in’t Veld, founder of Bureauvijftig, a Dutch marketing and communication agency that specialises in babyboomer and 50+ marketing. 50+, babyboomer or senior marketing is a relatively new domain. Marketeers tend to struggle to respectfully communicate with people growing old. Some campaigners are very succesfull in doing so, some fail miserably. We try to avoid the latter. A few examples struck me over the years.

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imageSP: Granny getting naked….
Healthcare is all about helping people who need it. Giving them comfort, warmth and the specific care they deserve. Personal contact and taking time for a patient. Not if we let the Dutch politicians decide. Then healthcare will be all about scheduled time and accountability. “Every day someone else to get undressed for. I could better take off my clothes for the entire nation.” A campaign by Dutch social party SP. Brilliant and ‘in your face’. It caused a political debate.

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See the video and the other choices from Arjan after the break.

imagePaul McCartney: From Beatles to Knight
A personal favorite, allthough really American. Marketing to 50+ is all about making a connection between the past and today. That is why I like this Fidelity commercial. Simple, realistic and something several generations can relate to. A Beatle, a father, a poet, a different role in every life stage. This is aimed at 50+, but not ‘old’ in its approach. Not only the babyboomers that once joined Beatle mania understand this commercial. Crucial for ageless communication in my opinion.

imageRollz: a design rollator…
Brilliant idea by the former founders of the Bugaboo, Off course elderly have different emotions with a rollator than mothers to be have with the Bugaboo, but still the idea of making a totally redesigned and trendy version of the usually very boring and grey rollator, is very good. “You’ve come a long way baby, Rollz will take you further”. I don’t know if they will succeed their mission to make the rollator fashionable, but they get my credits for giving it their best shot. www.rollzinternational.com

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imageRandstad: everybody has something with Randstad
A recent campaign by Dutch temporary work agency gives an overview of the last 50 years in which they were always there. Starting with Goldscheding, the founder, taking his female employees home on the bagage seat of his bike, to 2011, Randstad’s fiftieth anniversary. Brilliant and friendly campaign. About Remco bying an Aristona radio for 259 former Guldens. Those where the days.

imageWorst ever: the internet bootcamp
We sometimes tend to tal about old people as if they are senile and disconnected with society. Some European commities, under the supervision of Neelie Kroes, try to convince elderly that still haven’t found their ways online to give it a try. Nothing wrong with that, but don’t treat them like babies. They came up with the internet boot camp. Not only meant for the elderly, but for the 1,6 million digital nitwits living in the Netherlands. Of which off course the majority is over 50. Have a look for yourself, I think it is terribly disrespectfull and wouldn’t dare sending my father there. He’ll refuse anyway.
www.internetbootcamp.nl

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Founder of Osocio. It all started with collecting election posters in 1973. And that's never stopped. Read more.