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Help someone with ALS

Help someone with ALS

ALS-Society-of-Canada-banner

A great follow-up for the award-winning “Head and Shoulders” television spot this new campaign for ALS Society of Canada.
To coincide with ALS Awareness month (June), the ALS Society of Canada has launched its first interactive campaign, created by Lowe Roche, Toronto, to raise awareness about Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and to raise much needed funds to go towards research for a cure for the disease.

“ALS is a devastating disease – not only for the people who are diagnosed, but also for their families and friends who must become their caregivers,” says Geoffrey Roche, Chief Creative Officer, Lowe Roche. “The banners we created allow you to physically help somebody with ALS, giving you a glimpse into how destructive the disease is, and why we need to find a cure.”

The banner ads will be served on various big website like The Globe and Mail and mochasofa.com. People can also view the ads and make donations on the microsite helpsomeonewithals.ca.

Related posts about the ALS Society of Canada:
Head and Shoulders Knees and Toes
ALS Society of Canada: No Signal

Advertiser:
ALS Society of Canada
Agency:
Lowe Roche
Additional credits:
Director of Communications, ALS Society of Canada: Bobbi Greenberg

Chief Creative Officer: Geoffrey Roche
Associate Creative Director: Sean Ohlenkamp
Writer: Rob Sturch
Technical Director: Nery Orellana
Producer: Brie Gowans
Account Supervisor: Rachel Selwood

Production Company: Hard Citizen
Executive Producer: Jacinte Faria

Production Company: Secret Location
Executive Producer: James Milward
Creative Director, Secret Location: Pietro Gagliano
Technical Director: Ryan Andal
Project Manager: Noora Abu Eitah
Art Director, Secret Location: John Kumahara
Lead Developer: John Callaghan
Motion Graphics Artist: Steve Miller
Director of Photography: Robert Brunton
Source:
Glossy inc.

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