The best of non-profit advertising and marketing for social causes

Ride for Livestrong

Ride for Livestrong

ride-for-livestrong

This spring, Lance Armstrong and Team Radio Shack are dedicating their ride in the Tour of California to those who fight cancer. And in that spirit, LIVESTRONG Action is giving thousands the chance to do the same with I RIDE FOR LIVESTRONG, a virtual cycling event to build the global movement to fight cancer.

Through a quick online form, supporters select their gender, personalize a bike, and include a brief story about the person they’re riding for. Each racer will has an individual page where they can push friends and family to “cheer” for them in the race – by adding their names and joining the movement.
The racers with the most cheers move to the top of the leader board and the Top 100 are presented in a animation that shows the racers pedaling through the California landscape, visualizing each of the stories of the people they ride for.

The Top racers at the end of the Tour of California will have their “I Ride For…” sticker placed on Lance Armstrong’s bike during the Tour de France and the rest of the Top 100 will be entered in a raffle to have theirs appended to one of the other Team Radio Shack bikes.

I Ride for LIVESTRONG runs from May 12 through the conclusion of the Tour of California at 5pm PT on Sunday, May 23.

Katherine McLane, senior director for communications and external affairs at the Lance Armstrong Foundation: “We’ve done plenty of online campaigns, interactive and dynamic, but never anything quite as original as this.”
The goal of the game is to “reach new audiences and engage folks who want to become active” in fighting cancer.

Jeremy Heimans, chief executive at Purpose said that his agency’s work in creating livestrongaction.org with the foundation was “a great example” of working on an issue “in need of a real, 21st century movement” that can “help shift individual behavior, change culture and influence policy.”

Founder of Osocio. It all started with collecting election posters in 1973. And that's never stopped. Read more.