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Shameful campaign about fat, black, bald and ruddy people

Shameful campaign about fat, black, bald and ruddy people

Equal Pay Day: Shameful campaign about fat, black, bald and ruddy people

This is the yearly campaign from the Belgian Zij-kant.
The translation explains it all:
“Fat people should earn less.”

Smaller copy at the bottom:
“You think this is outrageous for fat people. Why not for women?”
“Women still earn 21% less than men.”

The video below is in Dutch, the idea is the same as in the print ad.
The three other campaign items are about black, bald and ruddy people. And women.
See them after the break.

In 2005 Zij-kant and ABVV Women launched Equal Pay Day in Belgium for the first time. Modeled after an American idea ‘Equal Pay Day’ is a day meant to expose and criticize the wage gap between women and men.

Some figures about the Belgian situation:
– ugly men earn 22% less than an average man, because they are considered less successful.
– bald men are more successful because they are seen as more dominant and more authoritative.
– fat women earn 6% less than their thinner colleagues.
– workers from the Maghreb countries and sub-Saharan Africa earn to 5 euros per hour less than Belgians.

Related posts from Equal Pay Day Belgium:
Equal Pay Day (2006)
It’s not the hormonal rages (2007)
Equal Pay Day 2010
Satisfaction: the Granny Remake for EqualPayday (2011)

Equal Pay Day: Shameful campaign about fat, black, bald and ruddy people

Equal Pay Day: Shameful campaign about fat, black, bald and ruddy people

Equal Pay Day: Shameful campaign about fat, black, bald and ruddy people

Facebook users can make a face swap with their profile photo. Attributes: a mustache, glasses, graying hair. To earn more.

Equal Pay Day: Shameful campaign about fat, black, bald and ruddy people

Update

The English version of the videos are now available:

 

Advertiser:
ZIJ-KANT
Agency:
Mortierbrigade

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